Constitution Party of Virginia

Bush Brothers Connived at Schiavo's Murder

by Scott T. Whiteman, Esq.

March 31, 2005 9:05 AM EST – Terri Schiavo died by governmentally imposed starvation. Terri's alleged unalienable right to life was waived by judicial fiat based solely upon the representations made by her husband, who, by the way, was not qualified to waive Terri's unalienable right to life either.

Most of the discussion was about "Terri's wishes," as represented by her husband, that she, allegedly, wished to be starved for 13 days. But even if this were true, which I do not believe based on an evidentiary review of facts the Courts would not hear, it doesn't much matter, since our lives do not belong to us. Instead, life is the immediate gift of God. Our lives cannot be alienated except according to God's Law without offense to He who granted us the gift.

Consider how Webster's 1828 Dictionary defines Unalienable: not alienable; that cannot be alienated; that may not be transferred; as unalienable rights. If Webster is right, and this is what our Founder's believed and covenanted with each other to secure, protect and defend, at the moment the State of Florida decreed that it would permit Terri's life to be waived, it was incumbent upon the Federal government to secure the body of Terri Schiavo for however-so-long as the State of Florida was intent on killing her.

I know the objections, "But this is a State's rights issue and to impose upon Florida a federal mandate would be to violate the principles of 'Federalism'." Such a statement can be made only by those who don't know what "Federalism" means.

In our confederated republic, there are a series of Oath, pledges and promises made between the Parties. One such promise is that government created by the States presently in Washington, DC would guarantee to each state that every other State would be "republican in form," which means that each State, as a condition of being in the Union, will share the same fundamental principles as the other States, among which is the recognition that the right to life is unalienable.

Terri Schiavo's right to life, due to the despotic act of the judiciary and the refusal of the governor to refuse obedience to an unlawful court order, was not protected. Prior to her death and pursuant to Federalist 43,§6, this gives rise to the Presidential duty to take possession of her for however-so-long as Florida intended to murder her.

If he had the temerity, the President could have recognised that America's charter declared that men are "endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable" and self-evident rights, including the right to life. President Bush could have declared that he would not stand by and watch his brother permit the murder of a woman in Florida. But, as President Bush said, "I've done all I can do," and indeed he did – which is why I did not vote for such an impotent leader. By his refusal to secure Terri's right to life, President Bush violated his Oath of office to faithfully execute the laws of the United States, including the requirement to secure Terri's life in Florida, and became a perjured wretch.

Governor Jeb Bush said, "I have talked to a whole lot of people that I respect, not just now but the first time when Terri's law was passed, to make the determination of what my powers are and they are not as expansive as people would want them to be … And I understand, they're acting on their heart and I fully appreciate their sentiments and the emotions that go with this, but .... I've consistently said that I can't go beyond what my powers are and I'm not going to do it. There are 90,000 abortions that take place in this state every year. That troubles me more than I can ever describe, but that doesn't mean that I have some secret powers to stop that. There are a lot of things that go on in society that trouble me and this is certainly one of them. To have someone starve to death troubles me greatly and we have done everything we can and we will continue to do so within the powers that I have."

While Governor Bush was "troubled" by the starvation of a woman in Florida, the state over which he possesses "supreme Executive powers," he officially consented that Terri be starved to death. Governor Bush connived at the impious command of the Court, violated his Oath of office protect Terri's unalienable right and became a perjured wretch.

Indeed, Governor Bush, you had the power, and were Oath-bound to save Terri. You have the power, and are Oath-bound to save 90,000 babies each year. Indeed, President Bush, you had the power, and were Oath-bound, to save Terri. You have the power, and are Oath-bound, to secure the right to life of the nearly 1.5 million babies who have their "unalienable" right to life waived by their mother in the various States. I expect you both will remain seated on your hands, "personally troubled" but politically impotent.

And why do we have such impotent and perjured wretches as our leaders? Because "We the People" keep electing them. The blood of Terri Schiavo is not only on the hands of George W. Bush and Jeb Bush, but also on each and every voter who cast their lot with them.

Scott T. Whiteman is a Reformed Christian, husband, and father of three. He is a practicing attorney in the State of Maryland, and served as Campaign Manager for Michael A. Peroutka as he ran for President in 2004.

 


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